Community Collections
Dashboard

2020

2015–2016

JSTOR’s Open Community Collections initiative unlocks the potential of institution’s special collections by making them openly available on the platform researchers, faculty, and students already know and use.

Crown Equipment's InfoLink platform is
a tool that monitors forklift health, operator activity, and provides management with vital data about an operation's safety and productivity. The enterprise 
InfoLink software needed an overhaul. The first task was redesigning the site’s IA and updating administrator tools for easy onboarding.

Crown Equipment's InfoLink platform is a tool that monitors forklift health, operator activity, and provides management with vital data about an operation's safety and productivity. The enterprise InfoLink software needed an overhaul. The first task was redesigning the site’s IA and updating administrator tools for easy onboarding.

grid of images
role

product design lead

information architect
interaction designer
visual designer

objective
objective

Create a tool that helps special collections librarians demonstrate the impact of contributing their institution's archival collections to their constituents. Use data to prove the value of the JSTOR Community Collections initiative.

Restructure the information architecture of the InfoLink software. Redesign the administration tools within InfoLink in a responsive format with an updated visual language.

Discovery Research

Background

Background

Background

Since the Community Collections intiative was fairly new for JSTOR, my team wanted to learn more about about the needs, motivations, and goals of librarian contributors. We started by conducting discovery research with eight Community Collections contributors.

Crown is an internationally renowned lift truck manufacturer. Designing quality, safe, and innovative trucks is in the company’s DNA. Forklifts and the operators who drive them are what make warehouses run, fueling industry, business growth, and ultimately revenue. For Crown, making software is about making a user’s experience with trucks better.

InfoLink enhances a customer’s experience using Crown lift trucks. The software monitors forklift health and operator activity to provide users with data concerning the operation’s compliance, productivity, safety, impacts, utilization, and energy. The enterprise version of InfoLink was not responsive and visually outdated.

Crown is an internationally renowned lift truck manufacturer.
Designing quality, safe, and innovative trucks is in the company’s DNA. Forklifts and the operators who drive them are what make warehouses run, fueling industry, business growth, and ultimately revenue. For Crown, making software is about making a user’s experience with trucks better.

InfoLink enhances a customer’s experience using Crown lift trucks.
The software monitors forklift health and operator activity to provide users with data concerning the operation’s compliance, productivity, safety, impacts, utilization, and energy. The enterprise version of InfoLink was not responsive and visually outdated.

Crown is an internationally renowned lift truck manufacturer.
Designing quality, safe, and innovative trucks is in the company’s DNA. Forklifts and the operators who drive them are what make warehouses run, fueling industry, business growth, and ultimately revenue. For Crown, making software is about making a user’s experience with trucks better.

InfoLink enhances a customer’s experience using Crown lift trucks.
The software monitors forklift health and operator activity to provide users with data concerning the operation’s compliance, productivity, safety, impacts, utilization, and energy. The enterprise version of InfoLink was not responsive and visually outdated.

Crown is an internationally renowned lift truck manufacturer. Designing quality, safe, and innovative trucks is in the company’s DNA. Forklifts and the operators who drive them are what make warehouses run, fueling industry, business growth, and ultimately revenue. For Crown, making software is about making a user’s experience with trucks better.

InfoLink enhances a customer’s experience using Crown lift trucks. The software monitors forklift health and operator activity to provide users with data concerning the operation’s compliance, productivity, safety, impacts, utilization, and energy. The enterprise version of InfoLink was not responsive and visually outdated.

Learning Goals

1. Learn about participant's goals and definitions for success of participation in JSTOR's community collections initiative

2. Understand core motivations of our contributors (primarily archivists, special collections librarians)

3. Determine most important data/metrics needed in a dashboard

Card Sort Activity

Research participants sorted 14 possible metrics into three columns:
Must have, Nice to have, and Not needed

card sort
card sort during remote user interview

Participant sorting the metric cards into the three columns (Must have, Nice to have, Not needed) using Optimal Sort during remote user interview.

Card Sort Results

card sort results

Card sort results showing the most to least important data points to participants.

Core motivations

During our discovery research, we dug in to our contributor's goals and their definitions of success to understand their core motivations. We chose to focus on meeting their first core motivation with our MVP.

  1. Show impact of my content based on how I define success (value)

  2. Help me improve the value of our content on JSTOR (improve)

  3. Identify opportunities for collaboration and new publishing (connect)

The next generation of the InfoLink product needed to be a cloud-based, responsive design that would provide deeper data insights and an improved user experience. Before management can track anything in the system, administrators must be able to create operator profiles in the system and grant them access to trucks. An initial task in redesigning InfoLink was reworking the site’s information architecture and guiding administrators through the user and truck setup processes.

The next generation of the InfoLink product needed to be a cloud-based, responsive design that would provide deeper data insights and an improved user experience. Before management can track anything in the system, administrators must be able to create operator profiles in the system and grant them access to trucks. An initial task in redesigning InfoLink was reworking the site’s information architecture and guiding administrators through the user and truck setup processes.

“Who was using it for what and where, where in particular is important. The more prestigious libraries using my book, our collections, the university uses that... location is a big deal.”

— ARCHIVIST, TUSKEGEE 

Measuring Success

Objective

Contributors have evidence to confirm the value of their collections.

As the lead UX designer on the project, my responsibilities included taking part in requirements gathering, determining task flows, iterative prototyping, testing, and creating detailed documentation.

As the lead UX designer on the project, my responsibilities included taking part in requirements gathering, determining task flows, iterative prototyping, testing, and creating detailed documentation.

Key Results

1. 75% of contributors providing feedback can use dashboard to assess the value of their hosting collections on JSTOR

2. We have 3 improvements prioritized for Q4 from contributor feedback

Wireframes

After learning about our users core motivations and needs, I set about wireframing different layouts and visualizations for the identified data points. I reviewed the concepts with the design team and product team, incorporating diverse feedback to refine the designs.

Three wireframes of a dashboard for contributors
Figma comments on dashboard wireframes

Design review feedback on dashboard wireframes

MVP Design

After iterating upon concepts, I finalized the design for an MVP release. I then created a mockup using the new JSTOR design system.

The enterprise InfoLink settings were complicated, confusing, and inconsistent. In addition to a four-tiered navigation structure, the pages themselves did not follow consistent patterns, and behaved in unexpected ways. First, I analyzed the information architecture of the user management portion of InfoLink and explored what admin users were thinking, feeling, and doing during each step to capture pain points.

The enterprise InfoLink settings were complicated, confusing, and inconsistent. In addition to a four-tiered navigation structure, the pages themselves did not follow consistent patterns, and behaved in unexpected ways. First, I analyzed the information architecture of the user management portion of InfoLink and explored what admin users were thinking, feeling, and doing during each step to capture pain points.

mvp wireframe and mockup

Validation testing

Understanding Users & Task Analysis

Understanding Users & Task Analysis

We then tested the MVP design concept to ensure that it met our user's core motivation of assessing the value hosting their institution's archival collections on JSTOR.

Learning Goals

As part of the discovery process, our UX research team visited customers to get an understanding of their team's makeup and the tasks that each team member completed throughout their day, specifically within InfoLink. We broke down roles and tasks associated with InfoLink and used a card sort activity to learn which team members were assigned to which roles, and how frequently the tasks were completed. This helped us gather valuable insights about each of our user types and compare against the identified pain points.

As part of the discovery process, our UX research team visited customers to get an understanding of their team's makeup and the tasks that each team member completed throughout their day, specifically within InfoLink. We broke down roles and tasks associated with InfoLink and used a card sort activity to learn which team members were assigned to which roles, and how frequently the tasks were completed. This helped us gather valuable insights about each of our user types and compare against the identified pain points.

1. Do participants understand this data?

2. Does it allow them to assess value?

3. What’s missing that is needed to assess the value?

4. What is actionable?

5. What about the experience is/isn’t working?

Findings

  • Almost no contributors had preconceived expectations of usage numbers
  • Usage on dashboard gives directional validation for their experiment so far
  • Looking for validation on where to go next 
  • Dashboard is clear, easy to use, accessible to contributors
  • The content of the dashboard will be used in reporting

Implemented design

User Creation Wireframes

I worked with developers to iteratively implement a design which included prioritized enhancements based on user feedback, including date range options and top institutions.

The process of creating a user in InfoLink was a frustrating endeavor. Without clear steps and consistent patterns, admins found the user setup process to be lengthy and difficult. In this phase of the design process, I began wireframing new, streamlined flows for creating a user in the system. I explored and vetted several directions before landing on a final design.

The process of creating a user in InfoLink was a frustrating endeavor. Without clear steps and consistent patterns, admins found the user setup process to be lengthy and difficult. In this phase of the design process, I began wireframing new, streamlined flows for creating a user in the system. I explored and vetted several directions before landing on a final design.

dashboard design mockup

Results

To determine whether we were successful with this initiative, we measured our results against our quarterterly OKRs (objectives and key results).

Key Result: 75% of participants can assess value

We found that 78% (or 7/9) of the participants we interviewed could use the dashboard to assess the value of hosting collections on JSTOR.

To measure our success against the key result, participants responded to the following questions from Strongly Disagree (1) – Strongly Agree (5):

1. The dashboard has enough info to help me evaluate the performance of my collections on JSTOR. (avg = 4.3)

2. I am able to understand the data presented in this dashboard. (avg = 4.3)

3. This dashboard contains most of the information that is important to me regarding the usage of my collections. (avg = 4.2)

Key Result: 3 prioritized enhancements from feedback

 1. Control date range (8/8 participants)

2. Usage by institution (8/8 participants)

3. Ability to share data with others in the library (6/8 participants)

4. Ability to filter collections on the graph and dashboard (6/8 participants)

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